Advantages and Disadvantages of Dental Bonding

Posted on : 26-02-2014 | By : Haddon Suttner | In : Dental Implants, Dentist and Dentistry, Oral Health, Preventive Dentistry

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Dental bonding is a procedure in which a tooth-colored resin material (a durable plastic material) is applied and hardened with a special light, which ultimately “bonds” the material to the tooth to restore or improve person’s smile.It’s not unusual to feel shy about smiling if you have imperfections in your teeth. Stained teeth may inhibit you from smiling as often or as big as you would like.

What is Dental Bonding?

Posted on : 18-02-2014 | By : Haddon Suttner | In : Dental Implants, Dentist and Dentistry, Oral Health, Preventive Dentistry

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Instant veneers or dental laminates are made of a composite tooth-colored material, which can be stuck or bonded directly onto the tooth surface. The entire appearance of the tooth structure can be changed to make them appear more aesthetically appealing. Trained aesthetic dentists can really tweak your smile in a few hours of time. Your dentist will evaluate each case individually and will let you know the dental bonding cost and the time required for the procedure.

Causes of Plaque

Posted on : 09-02-2014 | By : Haddon Suttner | In : Oral Health, Preventive Dentistry, Tooth Whitening

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Plaque contains many different types of bacteria, some of which are associated with developing gum disease. Most people develop some dental plaque, however, only some people develop gum disease. It is thought that infection is more likely to develop if defense against bacteria is reduced in some way, such as an excessive intake of sugar or lack of hygiene.

What is Plaque?

Posted on : 02-02-2014 | By : Haddon Suttner | In : Healthy Food, Oral Health, Preventive Dentistry, Tooth Whitening

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Plaque is a soft, sticky film that builds up on your teeth and contains millions of bacteria. The bacteria in plaque cause tooth decay and gum disease if they are not removed regularly through brushing and flossing.When you eat, the bacteria in plaque use the sugars in your food to produce acids that eat away at the tooth enamel. Repeated attacks cause the enamel to break down, eventually resulting in a cavity (or hole) in the tooth surface.