Symptoms of Gum Disease

Posted on : 09-02-2015 | By : Haddon Suttner | In : Dentistry for Children, Oral Health, Preventive Dentistry

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Gum disease or periodontal disease, called Periodontitis, begins with bacterial growth in the mouth and may end with tooth loss due to destruction of the tissue that surrounds teeth. Gingivitis or gum inflammation usually precedes periodontitis. However, not all gingivitis progresses to periodontitis. In the early stage of gingivitis, bacteria in plaque buildup, causing the gums to become inflamed and to easily bleed during tooth brushing. Although the gums may be irritated, the teeth are still firmly planted in their sockets. When gingivitis is left untreated, it can advance to periodontitis. Toxins or poisons, produced by the bacteria in plaque, start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. As the disease progresses, the pockets deepen and more gum tissue and bone are destroyed. When this happens, teeth are no longer anchored in place, they become loose, and tooth loss occurs. Gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults.

 

 

Gum disease is often silent; symptoms may not appear until an advanced stage of the disease. However, warning signs of gum disease include the following:

 

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or eating hard food
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Sores in your mouth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures

 

 

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